This is our first annual awards to recognize the incredible healthcare professionals making a difference in the healthcare community. Although we recognize there are many more that are profoundly impacting the industry, this award is our attempt to highlight some of the most noticeable professionals from several different disciplines.

The recipients of this award demonstrate what it means to be #ThrivingInHealthcare. This campaign signifies a person excelling in their work role, making a statement in their profession, and thriving in all areas of life.  #ThrivingInHealthcare doesn’t mean you are perfect – no one is. Rather, this campaign symbolizes dedication to growth and a determination to live your best life. We believe we all have a role to play to shape a better healthcare industry, and the way in which we start that is by giving ourselves the template to do so.

How are you #ThrivingInHealthcare? What lights you up about the work you do? How are you using your role to improve our industry? We want you to join in on the campaign. Share your story on social media using the hashtag and share your definition of what it means to thrive in healthcare.

Want to stay in the loop of all things wellness for healthcare professionals? Join our bi-weekly newsletter and read along with hundreds of others on our favorite stories, interviews, recs, reads, etc. to spark your personal growth and work well-being. Join The Thriving Collective Newsletter here!

Physicians - Part 3

top 50 most influential healthcare professionals

Name and credentials:

Austin Chiang, MD MPH

Handle and/or Site:

@austinchiangmd (Instagram/Twitter)

austinchiang.com

What led you into healthcare?

I was drawn to healthcare by a strong desire to allow others to reduce suffering and lead the most productive lives they can, as well as a curiosity to understand the science behind both normal and abnormal physiology.

What’s been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned in healthcare?

The most valuable lesson is the fact that there is an infinite amount that we have yet to understand about how the body functions and how disease affects it…and it’s okay to admit that.

What gets you up everyday?

I am driven by an optimism that not only can I treat disease, but I can also play a part in preventing disease. To me, part of prevention is ensuring patients are empowered to interpret the health knowledge that they encounter on a daily basis. At the moment, that means doing what I can to help educate on what I do and the conditions I treat, while dispelling myths and pointing out inaccuracies that may be disseminated by untrained individuals.

How do you use your platform to help others?

At the end of the day, I believe the more health professionals are active in discussing their expertise online, the more the integrity of health information can be protected from unsubstantiated health claims from untrained individuals. To that end, I try to educate about the conditions I encounter in my practice, while also using this as an opportunity to humanize my profession and bring the patients closer so we can help address their suffering as a team. I like to share my experiences from my medical journey with aspiring physicians while showing how gastroenterology encompasses much more than just colonoscopies.    

What’s your favorite book or podcast?

Like so many others, I enjoy listening to Nutrition Rounds by Dr. Danielle Belardo (@theveggiemd on Instagram). I also would like to plug Dr. Natalie Crawford’s As A Woman podcast; though her podcast is focused on empowering women and discussing fertility, even her first episode is captivating as she so eloquently discusses these very important matters.

What’s your top tip on being successful?

I feel that success is a moving target for me. I don’t necessarily consider myself successful. Everyone defines success differently and for me, it’s not in something material. It is more about being the best doctor I can be and contributing as much as I can to help my patients and public health as a whole. Focusing on this objective and the consistently working to improve upon myself is what propels me forward.

During stressful times, what are some of your favorite coping strategies?

I feel strongly about not feeling ashamed for taking time for myself, however brief as it might be. I like to indulge in simple pleasure like enjoying good food, discovering new music, and exploring the city I live in. As a physician we work long hours, take call, and are expected to assume responsibility for our patients 24/7, so it’s important to remember take a moment for yourself, even if it’s brief.

What are you most excited for this year?

I’m excited about further developing my skills as an endoscopist, building the bariatric endoscopy program at Jefferson Health, and further encouraging clinicians at Jefferson to participate actively on social media in my role as Chief Medical Social Media Officer for the institution. I am also excited to build the first professional organization devoted to clinician social media use, the Association for Healthcare Social Media, with other health professionals on social media. The founding members and I are excited to help provide resources, develop best practices, and help advocate for social media use to help improve the quality of online information for the health of our patients.

top 50 most influential healthcare professionals

Name and credentials:

Vania Manipod, DO (Psychiatrist)

Handle and/or Site:

IG/Twitter/FB: @freudandfashion

Blog: http://freudandfashion.com/

What led you into healthcare?

I am not one of those people who knew as a kid that I wanted to be a doctor. In fact, I wanted to be a broadcast journalist. But growing up, I always felt the familial pressures to become a physician. My grandfather was my role model – he raised 11 successful children and sent them all to college (several of them became doctors) on his small salary as a teacher in the Philippines. As the oldest grandchild of 33 grandchildren, he invested a lot of his attention on my education ever since I was in elementary school to ensure that I’d fulfill his wish for me to become a doctor. I approached my education with the mindset of pursuing a career in medicine, though deep down I truly wanted to be a broadcast journalist. I was set on informing my family that I didn’t want to attend medical school, but it wasn’t until the day I found out that my grandfather passed away from cancer, which was also the day I took my MCAT exam, that I confirmed my decision to become a doctor. My grandfather taught me the importance of providing help for people in need and I finally recognized my true purpose was to carry out this practice as a doctor.

What’s been the most valuable lesson you’ve learned in healthcare?
 
To “treat the patient, not the lab.” The value in our work is in building a relationship of trust and connection with our patients, however, the practice of humanism in medicine is starting to erode as a result of the corporatization of healthcare. It’s something we have to fight on a daily basis, but we must always remember why we went into healthcare in the first place, which is to help our patients, not to be a cog on the wheel of our healthcare system.

But when it comes to a valuable lesson I’ve learned in my field of psychiatry, the aspect that fascinates me the most is that there is an art to it — putting pieces together of a person’s life to formulate their current issues, in addition to awareness of how aspects of ourselves can get triggered during the interactions. So much self-awareness and insight is involved, and I am constantly learning something new about myself in the process.

 
What gets you up everyday?
 
Knowing that I have a sense of purpose in my career and in the relationships I have. Also, knowing that even if my day is going to be rough, I always make sure I have something to look forward to in the near future (like a trip since I travel a lot, spending time with friends and loved ones, a selfcare day, etc)
 
How do you use your platform to help others?
 
I use my own experience having sought mental health treatment in the past, in addition to my knowledge/experience as a psychiatrist to create content (whether as a public speaker, writer, influencer, etc) to destigmatize the topic of mental health.
 
What’s your favorite book or podcast?
 
I actually don’t have a favorite, but I listen to a lot of self-help audiobooks.
 
What’s your top tip on being successful?
 
Work hard, be persistent, have a sense of direction when it comes to your goals, follow your passion. Filter out the noise of others’ opinions and stay focused on your goal. Stay true to who you are. And most importantly, stay humble in the process.
 
During stressful times, what are some of your favorite coping strategies?
I reach out to my fiance, family, and friends. Staying connected is key for me. I also like to take a lot of breaks (whether a 5 min break to get up and stretch or a nice vacation getaway).
 
What are you most excited for this year?
 
My wedding — I’m getting married this Summer!
top 50 most influential healthcare professionals

Name and credentials:

Natalie Crawford, MD

Handle and/or Site:

IG: @nataliecrawfordmd

We are blown away by the impact of Natalie’s podcast, As A Woman. She uses her platform as a OBGYN to share knowledge about women’s topics as well as sharing her truth to empower you to own your voice and stand in your power. Dr. Natalie shows us what it’s like to thrive in a specialty she loves while encouraging her community to share the real, not-so-glamorous moments of our lives. Dr. Natalie shows up consistently with her mission to promote fertility awareness and encourage women to live their best lives.

top 50 most influential healthcare professionals

Name and credentials:

Mike Muellner, MD

Handle and/or Site:

IG: @mikemuellner

Dr. Mike offers valuable content in his blog and through social media and look into the life of a physician. We love how he isn’t afraid to break down hot topics in healthcare and his informational and medical educational posts. The way in which Dr. Mike authentically infuses his passions for health, wellness, travel, and good style inspires and engages so many in the healthcare community.

top 50 most influential healthcare professionals

Name and credentials:

Veronica Rodriguez, MD, MPH

Handle and/or Site:

IG: @doctor.vero

From medicine to fashion, Dr. Vero covers it all. Dr. Vero shows transparency in her journey, including the overwhelming emotions of joy when she found out she matched after two previous failure to match. Dr. Vero’s spunk and energetic personality show through on her social media and YouTube platform. She has consistently dedicated herself to learning, showing up, educating, and inspiring others. With successes and failures, Dr. Vero teaches us that failures are in essence a part of your path and how to use failures to your advantage to better yourself.

Categories: Top 50 HCPs

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